Quiz for Magisterial Reformation

  1. This Strasbourg reformer sought to unite the Lutherans and the Zwinglians. He was forced to leave Strasbourg due to the threat of being overcome by Catholics. He fled to Cambridge where he made an impact on the theology of the Anglican Church.

    1. Johannes Brenz
    2. Theodore Beza
    3. Martin Bucer
    4. Heinrich Bullinger
  2. This Swiss reformer who became pastor in Zurich after Zwingli's death. His Second Helvetic Confession would serve as a guide for reformed churches throughout Switzerland.

    1. Johannes Brenz
    2. Theodore Beza
    3. Martin Bucer
    4. Heinrich Bullinger
  3. This reformer joined Karlstadt at the Leipzig Debate in 1519. At first, Johann Eck debated Karlstadt concerning free will and grace, but this reformer joined the debate in July. He and Eck debated such issues as purgatory, indulgences, penance, and papal authority.

    1. John Calvin
    2. Ulrich Zwingli
    3. Martin Bucer
    4. Martin Luther
  4. This German humanist scholar became a supporter of Lutheran theology in Strasbourg and Basel. His attempts to persuade theologians in Zurich to subscribe to the Augsburg Confession were unsuccessful.

    1. Martin Bucer
    2. Wolfgang Capito
    3. Theodore Beza
    4. Heinrich Bullinger
  5. Historian and advocate of reform in Geneva who wrote to Queen Marguarite de Navarre defending Calvin and Farel and argued that women should take a more active role in the church.

    1. Marie Dentiere
    2. Argula von Grumbach
    3. Katharina Zell
    4. Martin Bucer
  6. This Bavarian noblewoman challenged the University of Ingolstadt faculty to debate her reformed views. Her letter was widely published throughout Bavaria.

    1. Katharina Zell
    2. Marie Dentiere
    3. Argula von Grumbach
    4. Jeanne of Navarre
  7. This German humanist and theologian was a close associate of Luther and authored the Augsburg Confession in 1530.

    1. Martin Bucer
    2. Theodore Beza
    3. Johannes Brenz
    4. Philipp Melanchthon
  8. This German Lutheran reformer in Nuremburg was often belligerent and not well-liked by his Lutheran or Reformed colleagues.

    1. Andreas Osiander
    2. Johannes Brenz
    3. Johannes Bugenhagen
    4. Wolfgang Capito
  9. He criticized Melanchthon's view of justification as too forensic. He argued that persons are transformed by Christ's divine nature that indwells them. His concept of justification was condemened by article 3 of the Formula of Concord.

    1. Johannes Bugenhagen
    2. Andreas Osiander
    3. Johannes Brenz
    4. Wolfgang Capito
  10. She was a Lutheran reformer in the city of Strasbourg. In 1523 she married prominent Lutheran pastor and shortly after their marriage, she began to publish works that addressed important issues of the Reformation.

    1. Argula von Grumbach
    2. Jeanne of Navarre
    3. Marie Dentiere
    4. Katharina Zell
  11. This reformer in the city of Bern was heavily influenced by Ulrich Zwingli. He participated in the Baden Disputation and wrote The Berner Synodus, a church order for Bern, with Wolgang Capito in 1532.

    1. Heinrich Bullinger
    2. Martin Bucer
    3. Berchtold Haller
    4. Peter Martyr Vermigli
  12. She declared her conversion to the Reformed faith in 1560 and was able to advance Calvinism around Bearn. She also shared leadership in La Rochelle with Catholic Cardinal Gaspard II as a result of the Peace of Saint-Germain Settlement.

    1. Argula von Grumbach
    2. Jeanne of Navarre
    3. Katharina Zell
    4. Marie Dentiere
  13. He was a Swiss humanist reformer, city physician, and mayor of St Gall. He was the brother-in-law of Conrad Grebel but rejected Anabaptism and suppressed the movement in St Gall. Under his leadership, the city also removed images and abolished the Mass.

    1. Ulrich Zwingli
    2. Berchtold Haller
    3. Joachim Vadian
    4. Peter Martyr Vermigli
  14. This Italian reformer who was invited to teach at Oxford University during the reign of Edward VI.

    1. Joachim Vadian
    2. Peter Martyr Vermigli
    3. John Calvin
    4. Andreas Osiander
  15. He was the leader of the Swiss Reformation in Zurich. He is often known as the "third magisterial reformer" because he implemented his reforms through the city council of Zurich.

    1. Ulrich Zwingli
    2. John Calvin
    3. Martin Bucer
    4. Heinrich Bullinger